Waterfalls

Whitewater Falls

One of the highest waterfalls east of the Rockies, Whitewater Falls stands at 411 feet and boasts a newly-paved path to an overlook and shelters for picnicking.

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Tom Branch Falls

Be sure to see this one in winter or early spring, as the post-rain flows make it one of the most beautiful in the Smokies, while in summer, overflowing foliage can obstruct it from the views of passing hikers.

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Sugar Creek Falls

A great setting for nature photographers, Sugar Creek Falls offers not one waterfall, but two.

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Silver Run Falls

It may not be the tallest or largest waterfall in the Smokies, but Silver Run Falls is lovely to look at.

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Schoolhouse Falls

The most well-known waterfall of Panthertown Valley, 18-foot Schoolhouse Falls, a mix of small cascades ending in a free fall from Greenland Creek, is best visited on a sunny summer day.

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Rufus Morgan Falls

One of North Carolina’s most beautiful wildflower trails, the hike to Rufus Morgan Falls is best trekked during the second half of April.

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Rough Butt Creek Falls

Far off the beaten path and fed by Rough Butt Creek, this scenic, 30-foot waterfall features cascading falls, a small pool, and banks overflowing with fern and rhododendron, and rocks coated in moss.

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Rock Slab Falls

A gentle waterfall flowing over smooth rocks sparkling with bands of quartz, Rock Slab Falls is a former logging camp littered with reminders of those who used to call it home.

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Moses Creek Falls

Calling all daredevils: While this 100-foot waterfall is a bit difficult to see, those comfortable with steep climbs and limber exploration might enjoy the thrill of finding the right angle for the perfect snapshot.

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Moore Cove Falls

With its frozen cascade in the winter and its wildflower variety in the spring and summer, this waterfall offers year-round sights.

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Mingo Falls

A photographer’s dream, this cascade is a multitude of waterfalls pouring from smaller ledges—making for spectacular wide shots and closeups alike.

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Looking Glass Falls

Best seen in winter, the cascade freezes over, with large icicles dangling from the upper edge and the base pool turning to ice as well.

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Juney Whank Falls

A perfect stop on the hike to Tom Branch Falls and Indian Creek Falls.

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Jawbone Falls

A sandy oasis of rosebay rhododendron, laurel, and white pine, this waterfall features a small island at the downstream end of its pool—perfect for just the right photo angle.

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Indian Creek Falls

Sometimes bustling, sometimes utterly peaceful.

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High Falls

Fed by the West Fork Tuckasegee River, High Falls includes a two-section free fall over a looming cliff.

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Greenland Creek Falls

At 45 feet high, the two-part cascade tumbles from Greenland Creek into a wide pool of moss- and lichen-blanketed boulders and often clear water.

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Granny Burrell Falls

Bring the kids here on a summer day for sliding, swimming, and sunbathing on the sandy beach of one of the largest pools of any waterfall in the state.

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Gina Falls

Most travelers through Pinnacle Park don’t know this beauty of nature exists, despite its lack of geographical obscurity.

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Frolictown Falls

Don’t be alarmed by the orange-brown color of Frolictown Falls’ water—it’s natural, colored by the tannic acid in the local soil.

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Dry Falls

The most popular waterfall in the region, Dry Falls offers a brand-new visitors’ center, featuring a handicapped-accessible viewing platform, an upgraded trail, odoriferous toilets and free entry.

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Cullasaja Falls

Cullasaja Falls and its similarly-named river source were named for the Cherokee word meaning “honey locust place” due to the prevalence of the trees in the area, the pods of which the Native Americans used as a sweetener.

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Courthouse Falls

Situated near the scene of a Cherokee myth, this waterfall offers both scenery and folklore, but beware the fast currents below.

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Chasteen Creek Falls

A great stop for campers staying at Smokemont Campground, Chasteen Creek Falls boasts gorgeous wildflowers in late spring and a challenging hike year round.

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Carlton Falls

Rhododendron, hemlock, and mountain laurel adorn this chute, which commemorates a man as memorable as the scenery itself.

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Bridal Veil Falls

This historic beauty, fed by the tributary of the Cullasaja River, transforms into a wall of icicles in the winter, veiling a portion of US 64—hence the name.

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Waterfalls

TAKE THE PLUNGE

You want waterfalls? We got ’em. Some can be spotted with just a short walk, while others take a little more effort. Either way, they are all totally worth the hike.
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Sapphire Valley Ski Slopes Open

Dec 15 until Dec 16  //  Starts: 5:00 am Ends: 4:59 am

Nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina, Sapphire Valley offers the area’s finest skiing facility, boasting a state-of-the-art quad li

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